Publications
Research Publication 2
Title Publication Date/Location
Depression among military spouses: Demographic, military, and service member psychological health risk factors Depression and Anxiety 2018 Dec;35(12):1137-1144

Donoho CJ, LeardMann CA, O’Malley CA, Walter KH, Riviere LA, Curry JF, Adler AB

In this study, 4.9% of military spouses had a probable diagnosis of major depression disorder (MDD). Spouses married to enlisted service members or those with PTSD had increased risk for MDD, after adjustment for demographic and military factors. Less education, unemployment, and prior military service among spouses, as well as having more than three children, were also associated with increased risk for MDD. These findings imply that deployment alone may not negatively impact military spouses, but rather adverse mental health of the service member, especially PTSD, may increase the risk for MDD among military spouses.

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Association of military life experiences and health indicators among military spouses BMC Public Health 2019 Nov; 19(1):1517

Corry NH, Radakrishnan S, Williams CS, Sparks AC, Woodall KA, Fairbank JA, Stander VA

The purpose of this study was to assess the extent to which military spouses' health behaviors met national physical health goals (Healthy People 2020), and to assess associations between health behaviors and sociodemographic characteristics, military experiences, and psychosocial factors. Attainment of national health goals was measured using six indicators of health: 1) healthy weight (body mass index), 2) aerobic exercise, 3) strength training, 4) sleep, 5) alcohol use (risky drinking), and 6) tobacco use. Overall, the majority of military spouses and service members met most of the HP2020 goals analyzed in the study, and the behaviors of each member of the couple were moderately correlated. Greater social support and perceived support from the military, in addition to several demographic variables, were associated with a greater likelihood of meeting the Healthy People 2020 goals among military spouses.

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Assessing and adjusting for non-response in the Millennium Cohort Family Study BMC Medical Research Methodology 2017 Jan;17:16

Corry NH, Williams CS, Battaglia M, McMaster HS, Stander VA

This paper examines factors contributing to second stage survey non-response during the baseline data collection for the Millennium Cohort Family Study, a large longitudinal study of US service members and their spouses from all branches of the military. Due to its design features, the Family Study offers a unique opportunity to thoroughly examine and adjust for non-response bias among military spouses by analysing extensive data collected from their service member partners on the Millennium Cohort survey, including sociodemographic and psychosocial characteristics. This study contributes to the interpretation and use of the Family Study data by describing the sample and examining and addressing systematic non-response in the baseline sample and provides insights to inform future study designs and recruitment practices involving military spouses.

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An experimental comparison of web-push vs. paper-only survey procedures for conducting an in-depth health survey of military spouses BMC Medical Research Methodology 2017 Apr;17:73

McMaster HS, LeardMann CA, Speigle S, Dillman DA

An experiment was conducted to compare two methods for surveying spouses married to U.S. Service members. Military spouses were assigned to either a web-push group (requesting online survey completion initially and then in later contacts offering a paper option) or to a paper-only group (requesting response by paper survey only). The web-push approach produced a significantly higher response rate and was less expensive than the paper-only approach, with no meaningful differences in spouse demographic, military, and health characteristics. Results suggest that a web-approach may be more effective with young military spouses because of their heavy reliance on the internet and that this may also hold true for the general population as they become more uniformly internet savvy.

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